Mobile Hunting Blinds

Mobile Hunting Blinds. Sewing Lined Draperies

Mobile Hunting Blinds

mobile hunting blinds

    hunting

  • hunt: the pursuit and killing or capture of wild animals regarded as a sport
  • (hunt) Englishman and Pre-Raphaelite painter (1827-1910)
  • The activity of hunting wild animals or game, esp. for food or sport
  • A simple system of changes in which bells move through the order in a regular progression
  • search: the activity of looking thoroughly in order to find something or someone

    mobile

  • a river in southwestern Alabama; flows into Mobile Bay
  • A decorative structure that is suspended so as to turn freely in the air
  • migratory; “a restless mobile society”; “the nomadic habits of the Bedouins”; “believed the profession of a peregrine typist would have a happy future”; “wandering tribes”
  • moving or capable of moving readily (especially from place to place); “a mobile missile system”; “the tongue isthe most mobile articulator”

    blinds

  • Cause (someone) to be unable to see, permanently or temporarily
  • A window blind is a type of window covering which is made with slats of fabric, wood, plastic or metal that adjust by rotating from an open position to a closed position by allowing slats to overlap. A roller blind does not have slats but comprises a single piece of material.
  • Deprive (someone) of understanding, judgment, or perception
  • The blinds are forced bets posted by players to the left of the dealer button in flop-style poker games. The number of blinds is usually two, but can be one or three.
  • window coverings, especially vertical blinds, wood blinds, roller blinds, pleated blinds
  • Confuse or overawe someone with something difficult to understand

mobile hunting blinds – Primos B-Mobile

Primos B-Mobile Decoy
Primos B-Mobile Decoy
The plan to hatch B-Mobile was conceived three years ago. It all started with a real stuffed gobbler we named Bob. Bob wasn-Feett the easiest thing to carry around in the woods, but man he got the job done! When turkeys saw Bob, they would come in running. Bob worked great to bring in those weary gobblers, but he was hard to tote around. We decided to try and build a decoy that worked as well as Bob but was more mobile. After working with prototypes of full strutting gobblers for the past three years, we finally had it all come together with B-Mobile (that-Feets short for Bob-Mobile). Now you have all the benefits of a mounted gobbler in an easy to carry unit. Includes: Strutting Gobbler Decoy, Fold-Up Silk Fan, B-Mobile Fan Holder, Decoy Stake, Carrying Bag, Instructional DVD.

New York Public Library, Hunts Point Branch

New York Public Library, Hunts Point Branch
Longwood, Bronx

Opened on July 1, 1929, the Hunts Point Branch of the New York Public Library was the last Carnegie branch library built in New York City. It is one of nine in the Bronx (eight still extant) and one of sixty-seven throughout all five boroughs, built when Andrew Carnegie donated $5.2 million in 1901 to establish a city-wide branch library system. The firm of Carrere & Hastings, architects of the New York Public Library building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, designed the Hunts Point Branch in the style of the Italian Renaissance. This striking building was the firm’s fourteenth and last Carnegie library. The library’s open plan and palazzo-inspired style are characteristic of the suburban Carnegie library type; notable architectural features include the building’s symmetry and horizontal massing, elegant blind arcade, richly detailed terra-cotta ornament, and arched first and second-floor windows providing abundant light to the simple interior The Hunts Point Branch has played a prominent role in the neighborhood for eighty years.

Hunts Point, along with Clason’s Point, Screvin’s Neck, and Throg’s Neck, is one of several large salt meadowland peninsulas in the Bronx that jut into the East River. Before European colonization, the Hunts Point area of the Bronx was associated with the Siwanoy Native Americans, a sub-group of the regionally dominant Wappinger group, which was part of the broader Algonquian cultural and linguistic group.2 Until the Civil War, Hunts Point was characterized as a rural area where prominent businessmen maintained country estates. As with many New York City neighborhoods, the creation and availability of transit routes to the Hunts Point area in the early twentieth century helped initiate development of the once-remote area. The opening of the extension of the West Side IRT subway into the Bronx in 1904 helped bring about a period of feverish land speculation southeast of Westchester Avenue near the transit line. The opening of the Intervale Avenue subway station in 1910, in particular, has been an acknowledged impetus for development near Hunts Point. The Hunts Point station of the New Haven Railroad, Harlem River branch, which had opened in the 1850s, began serving the area as a station of the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway line after 1912.

In addition to increased transportation options, local boosters could point to the many advantages the South Bronx offered to industry, including the excellent rail service and freight terminals of several major lines that provided the means for transporting raw materials, supplies, and finished products conveniently. There were ample sites for building in the vicinity of the waterfront or adjacent to rail lines, and the power to operate facilities was relatively inexpensive because of the easy access to coal deliveries. The growing local labor force could be supplemented by workers traveling to the Bronx via the rail and transit lines. In 1909, there were 700 factories in the Bronx; by 1912, the number of industrial operations in the borough had more than doubled. By the close of the first decade of the twentieth century, the local real estate press enthused that “a great city [was] building along Southern Boulevard.”3

At the start of the twentieth century most of the Hunts Point area was controlled by a small number of real estate developers, including George F. Johnson and James F. Meehan, who were developing elevator apartment houses, flats, and semi-detached houses near the subway stops.4 Construction of housing, including semi-detached houses and multiple dwellings of various sizes, in Hunts Point and in the nearby area accelerated after 1912. By 1915 most of the area around Southern Boulevard between Intervale Avenue and East 163rd Street had been developed with 5-story apartment buildings and 4-story rowhouses. The population housed by the new residential construction in Hunts Point was largely Jewish; other groups included African-Americans and people of Italian and Irish descent, and later a significant wave of Puerto Rican immigrants.5 A Catholic church, rectory and school occupied the lot next to the future Hunts Point Branch library site, which remained vacant land until construction of the library began in 1928.

The New York Public Library was established in 1895 as a private corporation, which received limited public funds. Formed initially by the merger of the Astor and Lenox Libraries and the Tilden Trust, it was primarily concerned with building a major reference library on the site of the old Croton Reservoir at Fifth Avenue on 42nd Street. The consolidation of New York City in 1898 inspired the growth and unification of the library institutions in the City, including the New York Public Library.

New York was one of the largest cities in the world with a population of three million in 1898 and growing rapidly. It trailed behind other cities in public library support, ranking ninth in p

New York Public Library, Hunts Point Branch

New York Public Library, Hunts Point Branch
Longwood, Bronx, New York City, New York, United States

Opened on July 1, 1929, the Hunts Point Branch of the New York Public Library was the last Carnegie branch library built in New York City. It is one of nine in the Bronx (eight still extant) and one of sixty-seven throughout all five boroughs, built when Andrew Carnegie donated $5.2 million in 1901 to establish a city-wide branch library system. The firm of Carrere & Hastings, architects of the New York Public Library building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, designed the Hunts Point Branch in the style of the Italian Renaissance. This striking building was the firm’s fourteenth and last Carnegie library. The library’s open plan and palazzo-inspired style are characteristic of the suburban Carnegie library type; notable architectural features include the building’s symmetry and horizontal massing, elegant blind arcade, richly detailed terra-cotta ornament, and arched first and second-floor windows providing abundant light to the simple interior The Hunts Point Branch has played a prominent role in the neighborhood for eighty years.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

Early Twentieth-Century Development of Hunts Point

Hunts Point, along with Clason’s Point, Screvin’s Neck, and Throg’s Neck, is one of several large salt meadowland peninsulas in the Bronx that jut into the East River. Before European colonization, the Hunts Point area of the Bronx was associated with the Siwanoy Native Americans, a sub-group of the regionally dominant Wappinger group, which was part of the broader Algonquian cultural and linguistic group. Until the Civil War, Hunts Point was characterized as a rural area where prominent businessmen maintained country estates. As with many New York City neighborhoods, the creation and availability of transit routes to the Hunts Point area in the early twentieth century helped initiate development of the once-remote area. The opening of the extension of the West Side IRT subway into the Bronx in 1904 helped bring about a period of feverish land speculation southeast of Westchester Avenue near the transit line. The opening of the Intervale Avenue subway station in 1910, in particular, has been an acknowledged impetus for development near Hunts Point. The Hunts Point station of the New Haven Railroad, Harlem River branch, which had opened in the 1850s, began serving the area as a station of the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway line after 1912.

In addition to increased transportation options, local boosters could point to the many advantages the South Bronx offered to industry, including the excellent rail service and freight terminals of several major lines that provided the means for transporting raw materials, supplies, and finished products conveniently. There were ample sites for building in the vicinity of the waterfront or adjacent to rail lines, and the power to operate facilities was relatively inexpensive because of the easy access to coal deliveries. The growing local labor force could be supplemented by workers traveling to the Bronx via the rail and transit lines. In 1909, there were 700 factories in the Bronx; by 1912, the number of industrial operations in the borough had more than doubled. By the close of the first decade of the twentieth century, the local real estate press enthused that “a great city [was] building along Southern Boulevard.”

At the start of the twentieth century most of the Hunts Point area was controlled by a small number of real estate developers, including George F. Johnson and James F. Meehan, who were developing elevator apartment houses, flats, and semi-detached houses near the subway stops. Construction of housing, including semi-detached houses and multiple dwellings of various sizes, in Hunts Point and in the nearby area accelerated after 1912. By 1915 most of the area around Southern Boulevard between Intervale Avenue and East 163rd Street had been developed with 5-story apartment buildings and 4-story rowhouses. The population housed by the new residential construction in Hunts Point was largely Jewish; other groups included African-Americans and people of Italian and Irish descent, and later a significant wave of Puerto Rican immigrants. A Catholic church, rectory and school occupied the lot next to the future Hunts Point Branch library site, which remained vacant land until construction of the library began in 1928.

History of New York City Libraries

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries libraries in New York City were private, institutional, or subscription. The New York Society Library, a subscription library where users paid a membership fee, was established in 1754, and Columbia University opened a library by 1757. Both were destroyed during the Revolutionary War but were rebuilt, and by 1876 Columbia had one of the largest collections in the country. Reading rooms, operated as businesses or by non-profit organizations, made books available to the public, and bookse

mobile hunting blinds

mobile hunting blinds

Primos She-Mobile Decoy
Behind every good man, there is a good woman and we felt like B-Mobile needed a good woman. She-Mobile is the perfect companion for B-Mobile. She is what you need to make your set-up more attractive to bring in that hardheaded Tom. She-Mobile can be staked along side B-Mobile as a contented hen or you can put her on the ground without a stake and she will assume the submissive hen position. Made from the same material as B-Mobile, She-Mobile is a sturdy decoy that can be rolled up and carried in your vest, making her the perfect companion for B-Mobile.